Venous Impairment MS 2017-01-19T12:39:00+00:00

VENOUS IMPAIRMENT PROGRAM FOR MS PATIENTS

HISTORY AND ORIGIN OF CCSVI

Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a term used to describe compromised flow of blood in the veins draining the central nervous system.

Outflow obstructions of the internal jugular veins, vertebral veins, and azygous vein result in stasis or reflux of these outflow veins and redirection of flow.

Many patients with CCSVI appear to have multiple sclerosis (MS), and many patients with MS have CCSVI.

Vascular surgeon Paolo Zamboni of Italy proposes that CCSVI has a role in the pathogenesis of MS.

He suggests that resistance to cerebrospinal venous outflow causes vicarious redistribution through small collateral veins that cannot handle high flow. Zamboni and his colleagues theorized that the malformed blood vessels caused increased deposition of iron in the brain, which in turn triggers autoimmunity and degeneration of the nerve’s myelin sheath.

Dr. Zamboni and his associates have performed interventional procedures to correct CCSVI and find that 73% of patients improved.

Some patients however, may only have transient relief, or no relief of their symptoms.

15 MINUTES THAT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

learn more about screening

THE VENOUS IMPAIRMENT PROGRAM FOR MS

We currently offer diagnostic testing and intervention for CCSVI.

The testing/intervention include:

  • Bilateral internal jugular and vertebral venous duplex ultrasound taken in supine and upright position
  • Multi-slice venous CT of the head, neck, and chest to assess venous flow in the internal jugular, vertebrals and azygous veins.
  • Venogram and venoplasty with possible stent (currently, only when absolutely indicated)

CBC, CMP, lipids, PT/PTT, TSH, and EKG prior to the intervention.